A strong consulting sector in Egypt can deliver a range of national benefits

04 October 2018 Consultancy-me.com

Developing a strong management consulting sector in Egypt should be seen as a broader strategic investment and as a matter of national interest, experienced local consultant Nadim Samna has argued in a piece for Egyptian English-language media outlet Ahram Online.

As one of the steadier management consulting markets in a growing, combined African sector worth an estimated $2.5 billion, the management consulting industry of Egypt still remains relatively underdeveloped, with its potential far from yet tapped. Doing so, and reaping the wider socio-economic benefits, will require a buy-in from a range of stakeholders, together helping to raise industry awareness, capacity and profile.

Already, the growing market potential can be perhaps evidenced through the recent arrival of international strategy and marketing consultancy Simon-Kucher & Partners with an office launched in Cairo in June, joining other global strategy and management names with a permanent presence in the country such as McKinsey & Company and PwC’s consulting wing Strategy& (formerly Booz & Co. – which established a local office in 2006).

“We’ll be one of the few international strategy consultancies in Egypt,” Simon-Kucher’s CEO Georg Tacke said at the time of the launch. “The market offers enormous potential. Egypt is one of the two strongest industrialised nations in Africa. Strong economic growth and excellently trained local specialists make the market particularly attractive to us. Geographically speaking, Egypt is an ideal starting point to enter the African market.”A strong consulting sector in Egypt can deliver a range of national benefitsNow, Nadim Samna, the founder and managing partner of local management consultancy Stratexis, who holds an MBA from INSEAD and has previously worked in senior management positions for Oliver Wyman in Dubai and for eight years in Paris with Kurt Salmon (which was acquired by Accenture in 2016), has argued that further developing the management consulting industry in Egypt is a matter of national interest.

Writing for the local media outlet Ahram Online, an English-language off-shoot of the state-owned news publication Al-Ahram, Samna outlines a range of public benefits which could flow from a greater strategic investment in consulting services and the development of the industry itself, including not only the maximisation of profits and improved international competitiveness of local companies, but through job creation and the establishment of a knowledge economy.

“On a macro level, consultants play an important role in modernising the economy by diffusing best practices, whose effectiveness has already been proven in other industries or markets,” Samna writes. “The strategic partnership recently signed between Egypt and the UAE to transform Egyptian governmental services is a good example of such benefits. Consultants in different areas will be responsible for transferring knowledge from the UAE to Egypt.”

Further, he argues, the management consulting industry can work with local universities to improve the professional services skills of graduates in a modern economy while also creating and providing jobs, citing the some 20 percent of currently unemployed Egyptians who hold advanced levels of education according to International Labour Organisation statistics, along with the rising 35 percent rate of local youth unemployment.

In turn, skilled consultants can export their services and generate inbound national revenues, with a recognised local management consulting industry then able to compete with other regional hubs as a go to market. “Building a talent pool in Cairo will drive international consulting firms to consider Cairo more seriously as a hub for their teams to benefit from the cost advantage of Cairo compared to Dubai,” Samna states in conclusion.

Carlos Ghosn's daughters get their career starts in strategy consulting

16 April 2019 Consultancy-me.com

With the Ghosn affair taking yet another twist, this time concerning allegations in Oman, the world’s media remains gripped.

A highly celebrated figure in Lebanon, the case of ex-Nissan and now ex-Renault head Carlos Ghosn has captivated the media round the world, with his re-arrest and detainment in Japan on further embezzlement charges last week – this time concerning allegations in Oman – delivering the latest twist in the saga. For his part, Ghosn continues to deny the charges, labeling the latest allegations of financial impropriety as “outrageous and arbitrary”.

Much of the media fascination stems from Ghosn’s remarkable story. Born to Lebanese immigrants in Brazil, Ghosn spent much of his youth in Lebanon before moving to Paris to pursue an engineering degree – and in almost no time arriving at the very top of the global automotive industry as a feted turn-around specialist, having rescued both Renault and Nissan from probable ruin. The other factor; a cultivated lifestyle of celebrity glamour.

Front and centre in that image was Ghosn’s young family, including a son Anthony and three daughters – Caroline, Maya and Nadine – who have all grown into their own spotlight in the international business and entrepreneurial worlds. And in line with that A-list background, all three of his daughters got their career starts at the crème de la crème of the strategy and management consulting world; prestigious MBB firms McKinsey & Company and BCG.The Ghosn family affair with the international consulting sector  The eldest Ghosn daughter, Caroline, joined McKinsey in 2007 following a BA in International Relations at Stamford University – before founding professional career network Levo in 2011 with three of her McKinsey associates. Her husband, Nicholas Flanders, CEO and co-founder of carbon reduction tech-company Opus 12, (and former COO of Levo), is likewise an alumnus of McKinsey – serving for three and a half years alongside Ghosn in the firm’s New York office.

Carlos Ghosn’s second daughter got her start at Boston Consulting Group.  A regonised name in luxury fashion as the founder and creative director of Nadine Ghosn Fine Jewelry, her brand counts and Beyoncé and the recently deceased fashion icon Karl Largerfeld among its celebrity clientele. At BCG, Nadine, who also graduated Stamford, served as an associate in the firm’s luxury and consumer goods practice before joining a management programme at Hermès.

Like her eldest sister, Ghosn’s youngest daughter Maya joined McKinsey’s New York office – spending over three years there as an engagement manager before departing in 2016. Maya is now Manager, Housing Affordability for the Chan-Zuckerberg Initiative, founded by Mark Zuckerberg and Pricilla Chan to promote social equality. Incidentally, Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg, a former McKinsey consultant, has been a mentor to Caroline and also founded Leanin.org, where Maya first started out as an intern.

Carlos Ghosn’s son Anthony – who has now been embroiled in his father’s affair with accusations of money being funneled via Oman toward his financial services start-up, Shogun (where he is CEO but has not been accused of any direct involvement) – didn’t get his break at an MBB, but his step-brother, Anthony Marshi, the son of Carlos Ghosn’s second wife Carole Nahas, is a partner with BCG in New York according to French newspaper Le Figaro.